The Training Plan

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Plan Overview

Your workouts will not list specific exercises, but muscle groups/body parts to train.  This will allow some flexibility and more variety in your training.

You will have a list of exercises to choose from for each muscle group and access to exercise demos via my app.  Alternatively youtube can be used.

You will see 3 tiers in each basic and advanced plans, a total of 6 Tiers or levels of volume (low volume = less work done, high volume = more work done).  This will allow progression for those needing to push harder and regression for those who feel they need a little more recovery.

Stretching.  There will be 3 types of stretch you can perform and it's up to you which you do based on how you feel. 


Basic Plan

 

The first training plan you'll follow is the basic version.  Don't confuse this with being easy.

It's simply less volume and a little more basic than the advanced version.

Basic Plan

Tiers I, II & III

 

 

Advanced (Turbo) Plan

The advanced plan is for those who need or want to progress in volume and intensity past Tier 3 of the basic routine.  Some of you may never use this, however some will need or want the progression.  

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Advanced Plan

Tiers I, II & III

 

Exercise List by Muscle Group

 

You can use an app, youtube or this list of exercises to find an appropriate exercise for the muscle group you need to train in your plan.

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Exercise List

listed by muscle group

 

Stretching for flexibility and growth

There are three types of stretch you will have the option of performing.

Your 

Flexibility stretching - for (you guessed it) flexibility

This can be done before training as a general warm up and or in between exercises during training.  It is held for 20+ seconds.

Occlusion  stretching - for metabolic stress (a burn) - the goal is to cause growth via metabolic stress

Occlusion stretching should be performed during training immediately after (2 min max) your working set.  e.g. you train your last set on chest and then stretch your chest immediately before moving onto the next muscle group.
The stretch is with a light isometric/static (not moving) load and the idea is to keep blood within the worked muscle and increase the lactic acid burn.  It should feel slightly uncomfortable and is held for 60-90 seconds

Extreme stretching - for loading and metabolic stress - the goal is to cause growth

Extreme stretching is performed under load in a stretched position e.g. chest stretch in the lowest position of a chest press while holding dumbbells of upto a 60% max load.  the goal is to stress the muscle with load (the dumbbells) and to cause occlusion to increase metabolic stress just as with the above mentioned occlusion stretch.

As with the occlusion stretch this type of stretch should be performed during training immediately after (2 min max) your working set.  e.g. you train your last set on chest and then stretch your chest immediately before moving onto the next muscle group.

Care should be taken not to over stretch and cause damage or irritation to tendons.  It should feel moderately to fairly uncomfortable and should be held for 60-90 seconds.

There are many stretches you may perform and I will let you google and youtube these to find options to suit you.

That said, as a general rule the stretch position of your last exercise will often be a good stretch to use. e.g. in a chest press, leg press, or shoulder press, the down/low position will work as an extreme stretch after those exercises. 

Types of Sets and Rest

Load Sets: 
As heavy as possible for 6-12 reps
The goal is mechanical fatigue
You should fail at 7-12 reps
If you can't lift 6 reps - it's too heavy, if you can lift 13+ reps - it's too light.
Your rest period is typically going to be 120 seconds (2 minutes) or as instructed in your program.

Pump Sets: 
As heavy as possible for 15-25 reps.
The goal is metabolic fatigue (the burn).
You should fail at 16-25 reps
If you can't lift 15 reps - it's too heavy, if you can lift 26+ reps - it's too light.
Your rest period is typically going to be 60 to 90 seconds (1 to 1.30 minutes) or as instructed in your program.

Muscle Rounds: 
Using a weight that you can lift for approx 15 reps (or best guess)
Perform 6 rounds of 4 reps followed by 8-10 seconds rest (1:1 work/rest ratio). 
You're aiming to fail ONCE mid-set and the 6th round should be to failure instead of 4 reps. 
Your rest period is the same as your working set. If you take 2 mins to finish your set, you will rest for 2 mins.

e.g.

R1: 4 reps > 10 sec rest
R2: 4 reps > 10 sec rest
R3: 4 reps > 10 sec rest
R4: 3 reps > 10 sec rest (failed at 3 reps so decreased weight)
R5: 4 reps > 10 sec rest
R6: Reps till failure > finish
Time taken: 2 mins.
Rest: 2 mins

Rest-Pause: This is a technique that can be used to lift heavier than normal.  You will have 2 pauses when you hit failure each time.

e.g. target is 11-15 reps 

7 reps > fail > rest 10 sec
4 reps > fail > rest 10 set
3 reps > fail > finish on 14 reps total

Training with a Buddy and "spotters rest": When training with a buddy you can use what we call "spotters rest" to time your rest periods.  When you're training your buddy is resting and when your buddy is training, you're resting.  You should still time your rest so that you have enough rest - that's important, however, for Muscle Rounds it's ideal because the rest/work ratio should be 1:1.